Nomad logo showing a Camel and 'NOMAD ESU'
News

Scouting out memories

Generations of Learning is delighted to announce a new collaboration with the 37th Willesden Scout Group, The Nomads.

nomad logo

Led by Nick, Noura, and Valentina, the Neasden-based group have taken on the challenge of planning and delivering memory sharing events over the summer.

Exciting and creative ideas are already emerging, with a speed-dating style social to give Elders and youngers the chance to share memories and stories about migration in the local area. There is even talk of a magician…

The FREE events are being planned for Friday 31 August and Saturday 15 & 29 September, so watch this space for more exciting details.

Newspaper clipping with photo of young scoutIn the meantime, archive research completed by members of the local history society uncovered a story from 1965 of a young Scout from Neasden, John O’Shaunessy, who was awarded a Queen’s Scout Badge. The article, from the Willesden Chronicle of 1 January, reveals that the local Scouts work with Elders goes back some way, noting that the Scouts had been hosting an Old Age Pensioners dinner when John was presented with his award.

Do you know John? We would love to hear from you!

News

OLOG Artists

This week Sorcha, the project lead, and Alistair Lambert, the project artist were invited to talk at Our Lady of Grace junior school in Dollis Hill.

With the amazing assistance of Margaret O’Mullane, teacher and talented artist in her own right, and the support of the school staff, pupils have been working over the past few weeks to create an artwork for the project.

Sorcha gave a short presentation at the school assembly to update everyone on the project, and Alistair excitingly unveiled the almost-finished Migration sculpture.

 

The artwork will be premiered at our Summer exhibition, which will travel to community venues around the area. Info will be posted on our Events page.

Our Lady of Grace recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. The school grew to accommodate the children of migrants, including many Irish who came to the area in the 1960s. Local tradition tells that many Irish men were involved in the construction of new school buildings.

If you were one of the men involved in construction work, or have a story about the early days of the school, please get in touch. Call Sorcha on 0208 208 8590.

 

 

Outdoor sign with welcome written in many different languages
Migration History, News

The Art of Migration

As we continue with work to record the oral histories of the Elder generation of migrants, we are also working with the younger generation to celebrate immigration.

One project is bringing together a local artist, Alistair Lambert, with primary school pupils to create a new artwork on the theme of migration stories. The piece will feature in our travelling exhibition over the Summer.

Outdoor sign with welcome written in many different languages
The Welcome sign at Our Lady of Grace junior school Dollis Hill

Our Lady of Grace junior school in Dollis Hill welcomes children from many different backgrounds, to create a friendly and encouraging learning environment. This children are part of the continuing story of migration to the British isles.

The story stretches back some 2,000 years, to the times of the Romans. Then, people from across the empire – from Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East – settled and built lives in Britannia, alongside the ancient Britons.

Some 1.500 years ago, waves of Germanic peoples, the Saxons, came to England, integrating with the British. And 500 years later, Normans from France established themselves in England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. The 1600s brought French Huguenots fleeing religious persecution and then Dutch merchants, accompanying the new king, William of Orange. Many modern English families also have Dutch and French heritage as a result of these migrations.

The 19th century welcomed significant new communities of Irish people, Jews from Eastern Europe, and Italians. Smaller communities from India (which then included the area that would become Pakistan), Africa, and Yemen grew around the ports, especially Hull and Cardiff, as the growth of the British Empire increased global sea trade. The cultural diversity of the port cities of Glasgow and London reflect the diversity of the empire.

In the 20th century Irish migration continued to grow, even after independence in 1922. And in the years after the end of the Second World War in 1945, thousands were invited to come and help Britain rebuild, especially from countries in the West Indies, India, Pakistan.

The children at Our Lady of Grace include the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of these settlers, alongside children who have arrived more recently from Eastern Europe, South America, and Africa. And many children have mixed heritage, as blended families share Irish, English, African, and European roots. They are the latest chapter in the on-going story of Britain.

We can’t wait to what wonderful art they create.